Elephant Butte

Shiprock

Tough Putt

Meandering Stream

69th Program Year – Fourth Meeting

Tuesday, November 7, 2017, 6:00 PM, Tanoan Country Club, 10801 Academy Blvd. NE

The Program: “The Rise of Erdogan: The Crisis of Turkey.” Since the failed coup of July 2016, Turkey’s authoritarian slide has intensified. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has used his post–coup State of Emergency powers to crack down not only on putschists, but a wide group of opposition factions from seculars to liberals to leftists, and Kurdish nationalists. Accordingly, Turkey is now divided into two blocks: a mostly conservative half (many members of which Erdogan has lifted out of poverty in the last decade) that adores him, and a mostly leftist half that loathes him.

Presenter: Dr. Soner Cagaptay is the Beyer Family fellow and director of the Turkish Research Program at The Washington Institute. He has written extensively on U.S.–Turkish relations, Turkish domestic politics, and Turkish nationalism, publishing in scholarly journals and major international print media, including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, New York Times, Jane’s Defense Weekly, Foreign Affairs, Atlantic, New Republic, and Newsweek Türkiye. He has been a regular columnist for Hürriyet Daily News, Turkey’s oldest and most influential English–language paper, and a contributor to CNN’s Global Public Square blog. He appears regularly on Fox News, CNN, NPR, Voice of America, BBC, and CNN–Turk.

A historian by training, Dr. Cagaptay wrote his doctoral dissertation at Yale University (2003) on Turkish nationalism. Dr. Cagaptay has taught courses at Yale, Princeton University, Georgetown University, and Smith College on the Middle East, Mediterranean, and Eastern Europe. His spring 2003 course on modern Turkish history was the first offered by Yale in three decades. From 2006–2007, he was Ertegun Professor at Princeton University’s Department of Near Eastern Studies.

Dr. Cagaptay is the recipient of numerous honors, grants, and chairs, among them the Smith–Richardson, Mellon, Rice, and Leylan fellowships, as well as the Ertegun chair at Princeton. He has also served on contract as chair of the Turkey Advanced Area Studies Program at the State Department’s Foreign Service Institute. In 2012 he was named an American Turkish Society Young Society Leader.

Sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories
Exceptional Service in the National Interest

69th Program Year – Third Meeting

Friday, October 20, 2017, 6:00 PM, Tanoan Country Club, 10801 Academy Blvd. NE

The Program: “How To Think About Future Wars” Thinking about future wars is bound up with current policy debates. A better future comes with the right policy choices. For example, Graham Allison sets out how dangerous the situation with China could become if his ideas for improving relations are not accepted. It is also bound up with past experience. The reason surprise attacks loom so large in US thinking is because of Pearl Harbor, although this case should also warn of the folly of gambling everything on a first blow. The fixation with surprise attacks is also encouraged by fascination with new technologies. This comes together in expectations that future wars will start with a devastating cyber–attack that will cripple critical infrastructure yet the reality of modern war is one of conflicts without clear beginnings and ends, in which first blows are rarely decisive.

Lawrence FreedmanPresenter: Lawrence Freedman was Professor of War Studies at King’s College London from 1982 to 2014, and was Vice–Principal from 2003 to 2013. He was educated at Whitley Bay Grammar School and the Universities of Manchester, York and Oxford. Before joining King’s he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, IISS and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. Elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995 and awarded the CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 1996, he was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign in 1997. He was awarded the KCMG (Knight Commander of St Michael and St George) in 2003. In June 2009 he was appointed to serve as a member of the official inquiry into Britain and the 2003 Iraq War.

Lawrence Freedman has written extensively on nuclear strategy and the cold war, as well as commentating regularly on contemporary security issues. Among his books are Kennedy’s Wars: Berlin, Cuba, Laos and Vietnam (2000), The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy (3rd edition 2004), Deterrence (2005), the two volume Official History of the Falklands Campaign (second edition 2007) and an Adelphi Paper on The Transformation in Strategic Affairs (2004). A Choice of Enemies: America confronts the Middle East, won the 2009 Lionel Gelber Prize and Duke of Westminster Medal for Military Literature. His most recent book is Strategy: A History (2013) was awarded the W J. McKenzie Book Prize by the Political Studies association.

Sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories
Exceptional Service in the National Interest

69th Program Year – Second Meeting

Tuesday, September 26, 2017, 6:00 PM, Tanoan Country Club, 10801 Academy Blvd. NE

The Program: “The View From Washington: Foreign Policy Opportunities and Challenges” Ambassador Kenney will review the key foreign policy challenges facing the Trump Administration and discuss policy approaches under consideration. She will also highlight the inter-agency dynamics in Washington and how they affect policy formulation.

Ambassador Kristie KenneyPresenter: Ambassador Kristie Kenney holds the State Department’s highest diplomatic rank of Career Ambassador. Over her 30 year career, she has represented the United States abroad as Ambassador three times and served in senior positions at the State Department and the White House.

Ambassador Kenney served as the 32nd Counselor of the State Department, the Departments fifth ranking official position and on behalf of Secretary Kerry, led delegations to Latin America and Asia. As Ambassador to Thailand from 2011-2014, Ambassador Kenney was the first female to head U.S.Embassy Bangkok, one of the United States largest diplomatic missions with over 3,000 staff. She was the Ambassador to the Philippines from 2006-2010, the first woman to hold that post. She coordinated U.S. military and development assistance over multiple natural disasters. During this and subsequent assignments, she pioneered use of social media by U.S. Ambassadors to connect with diverse and dynamic foreign audiences. Earlier, she served as Ambassador to Ecuador where she advanced U.S. business and security interests in Latin America.

Ambassador Kenney holds a Bachelor’s degree from Clemson University and a Master’s degree from Tulane University. She also attended the National War College in Washington, D.C. She speaks Spanish and French, as well as some Thai and Tagalog. She is married to Ambassador William Brownfield. When not rooting for Washington area sports teams, Ambassador Kenney enjoys travel, skiing, and connecting with social media friends around the world.

Sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories
Exceptional Service in the National Interest

69th Program Year – First Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2017, 6:00 PM, TANOAN COUNTRY CLUB, 10801 ACADEMY BLVD NE

The Program: “Cuba: Myths, Lies and Contradictions” Until President Obama’s opening to Cuba, powerful Cuban lobbies controlled U.S. policy toward the island. President Trump’s Cuba policy reversed Obama’s opening, returning our Cuba policy to a small clique of conservative Cuban Americans. The possibility of a normal relationship between our countries has evaporated, leaving key issues which bedevil our relationship—the embargo, Guantanamo Base, and settlement of expropriated property—unresolved. We have lost a unique opportunity to repair our relations with Cuba, instead Cuba will seek closer alliances with Russia and China.

Ambassador HuddlestonPresenter: Ambassador Huddleston was the U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for African Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 2009-11. She is a former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Africa; U.S. Ambassador to Madagascar and to Mali; Principal Officer of the U.S. Interests Section in Havana and Chargé d’affairs ad interim in Ethiopia. She was Deputy Chief of Mission in Haiti, and Director and Deputy Director of Cuban Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. Prior to joining the U.S. Department of Defense, she was a Visiting Scholar at Brookings Institution. Ambassador Huddleston was a Fellow at the Institute of Politics of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow on the staff of Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM). She began her overseas career as a Peace Corps volunteer in Peru. She also worked for the American Institute for Free Labor Development (AIFLD) in Peru and Brazil. Huddleston earned a Masters Degree from Johns Hopkins School Advanced International Studies and a BA from the University of Colorado. She has received U.S. Department of State awards, including a Distinguished Honor Award and a Presidential Meritorious Service Award. In 2008, she was a member of the Obama-Biden Transition Team for the U.S. Department of State. She has written opinion pieces in The New York Times, The Miami Herald, and The Washington Post and is a former commentator for NBC-Universal. She is married to Bob Huddleston, a former USAID officer, and they have two children, Alexandra and Robert.

Sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories
Exceptional Service in the National Interest